Danielle Perrault: Studying Opera, That Stunningly Gorgeous Musical Expression of Human Emotion That Goes Right to Your Soul

Then there are difficulties with societal perceptions. “It seems like every few months, someone publishes a new article about how opera is dying,” said Perrault. “I can see how people come to that conclusion, especially with the culture we live in now. Everything is instantaneous. Opera is hard. It’s a difficult art form to consume. Even for people in it, it is challenging. For one, it often takes a lot longer to say things when they are sung. You have to be patient. The story takes a little longer to unfold. If you don’t know the language the opera is being sung in, or even if you do, you have to rely on translations projected above the stage. It takes a little more work than sitting in front of the TV. But because of all of that, it’s rewarding. Because things take longer to say and because the story takes longer to unfold, it builds a greater sense of dramatic tension, and the payoff is greater. You get to experience stunningly gorgeous musical expressions of human emotion that words alone can’t convey.”

Pocono Princess: “Looking to Spread a Little Happiness”

In 2015, Toris-Silva found princess companies in New Jersey and developed a plan to introduce the princesses on the train. “I didn’t know what to do, so I saw there were companies in New Jersey that did this and reached out to them,” shared Toris-Silva, who was able to offer the companies a mixture of financial payment and marketing through the museum and the events they attended. “It worked out well for them. They agreed to that and were able to secure events from that. Due to the popularity, we decided to try a non-moving event at the museum, which was a tea party that takes place in an antique train car. It sold out in nine hours. We added a second weekend just for the demand.”