Ruby Allain (5): “I’m an artist, too.”

Ruby Allain only turned five at the end of April, but she’s already making her mark as an artist. “We all hang out together in our one big room and share supplies,” explained her mom, Morgan. “The bookmark thing started because when Danny and I have to cut down paper, there’s usually an inch left… Continue reading Ruby Allain (5): “I’m an artist, too.”

Pocono Princess: “Looking to Spread a Little Happiness”

It all started with trains. Sean Toris-Silva, who started Pocono Princess, LLC, with his wife, Jennifer, was recovering from an injury in 2011 and decided to drive around Whippany, NJ, lacking anything better to do. Toris-Silva was working and continues to work full-time as a flight paramedic, and has worked in emergency medical services for… Continue reading Pocono Princess: “Looking to Spread a Little Happiness”

Danny Allain: “I’m not the next big guy or anything. It’s just me. I make stuff.”

Danny Allain learned to read using his brothers’ comic books years before he started writing and drawing his own. The youngest of six, with two brothers and three sisters, Allain mainly stayed at home, drawing and playing in the woods of DeQuincy, LA. Comics made it easy to follow the story, even without knowing how… Continue reading Danny Allain: “I’m not the next big guy or anything. It’s just me. I make stuff.”

Jenna Rayesky Floral Studio: “It is possible.”

Rayesky realized that when a talent comes naturally, whether floral design, photography or another creative field, there is an intimidation when it comes to setting prices. “I had to overcome that hurdle,” Rayesky explained. “There was a wedding we did two years ago. When all was said and done, we made $3 an hour while working 80 hours. It’s insanity--working on four hours of sleep."

Elizabeth Kinahan Paintings: “A Way We Can Share an Experience”

“My responsibility as an artist is to think as creatively and outside the box as possible,” Elizabeth Kinahan shared. “That skill of visual art is valuable to other people. That is where I struggled the longest--in seeing there is value in painting pictures. He was powerful in teaching me a lot about that. He would say, ‘Let’s walk around town and go into the shops and see what art they have up. If they don’t have art up, we can say, wouldn’t it be nice if you had art on your walls? We’re artists. We can put some art up. And if it sells, we can give you 10-15% of that piece.’ I said, ‘That’s crazy. We can’t do it.’ He said, ‘Nope, let’s go.’ We got our art up all over the place."

Quiet Bear Art: “Trading an Object that Means Joy”

After ten years, Ken Webb began to realize he couldn’t stay at his job for another 35 years. “It was a decent job, but wasn’t too fulfilling,” he admitted. “It all came together at some point over the period of a few years that I wasn’t content and happy doing the daily grind that I saw people doing of getting up and punching the clock. … I was slowly doing more art as a side hobby and that was the direction I wanted to go. It was pretty difficult leaving a pretty secure job for something I didn’t know how to make a living at.”

Henna Blessings: “You Never Know if You Don’t Try”

The draw to the art form was deeper than something fun for Molly Arms to try. Arms wasn’t interested in permanent tattoos, and henna provided a way she could wear her art constantly. “In the beginning, it was because I wanted to do henna on myself,” Arms shared. “I didn’t think about a business.”